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Elettrocondutture S.p.A.

As far back as the first half of the 20th century, Elettrocondutture S.p.A., with its head office in Milan, was one of the few leading Italian companies which marked the historical milestones of the low voltage plant engineering evolution. Back in the 1930s, under the guidance of the Calì family, it had already introduced the first Stotz-Kontakt automatic circuit-breakers in Italy. These represented the development of the first types of automatic protections, whose invention by the German company even dated back as far as the 1920s.

In 1950, when collaboration with BBC Brown Boveri had been strengthened, production was extended to remote switches and industrial relays and, at the beginning of the 1960s, immediately after the inauguration of the new factory in Milan, the Elettrostop residual current circuit-breakers were patented. These were the ancestors of the present series of residual current protection devices found in every domestic, service sector and industrial electrical installation.

The new factory in Pomezia was opened at the beginning of the 1970s. This worked alongside the one in Milan to produce the different series of circuit-breakers featuring the technological innovations which have progressively established themselves. The same period also saw introduction of the first series of miniaturised modular apparatus in Europe.

The automatic and residual current circuit-breakers, which represented the company’s traditional market, were placed side by side with a continuously widening range of products and systems: PLCs and other electronic equipment for industrial automation, switchboards, building automation systems, etc.

At the end of the 1980s, Elettrocondutture became part of the ABB Group where it has carried on developing and selling products and solutions, constantly keeping pace with progress of the technologies available and with the increasing new needs of all the operators in the electrical and automation sectors.